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Shellac

Although French Polish is the general term used for all types of shellac polish, it is also a Shellac Polish colour in its own right. There are many blends of shellac polish that have been developed over the years.

The following products listed represent the bulk of those currently sold. Shellac is such a versatile product from finishing antiques to using as a non-reactive barrier between two normally incompatible finishes. Used carefully it will produce stunning results. Click here for product data sheet.


French Polish

Rich medium brown in colour, commonly used on walnut, oak and mahogany. French Polish is used to produce a warm dark transparent film. The appearance is unique and cannot be truly recreated with modern lacquers and finishing techniques.


Pure Button Polish

Similar to French Polish but more popular within the Antique Restoration trade, as it gives a slightly warmer patina than French Polish. Button and French are durable enough for most types of antique decorative furniture.


Special Pale Polish

The classic Pale Polish produces a superb finish and is suitable for antique table tops. As with all shellac polishes, working surfaces should be protected with place mats as heat and alcohol will affect these products.Superfine White Polish

Commonly used on pale natural timbers such as oak, ash, beech and sycamore. White Polish produces a beautiful high gloss finish. As it gives a softer finish, it is suitable for panelling bookcases, ornamental furniture and chairs. It is unsuitable for dining table tops or high durability areas. White Polish appears cloudy white in solution but dries to a clear film.


Garnet Polish

The darkest of all polishes. Garnet Polish does not emit a warm glow like Button Polish. A cold brown colour. Always use in a well-ventilated area. Apply at room temperature.


Heat Resistant Polish

This is the most durable of Shellac Polishes. It is a polish which has actually been modified without the addition of modern resins. During ‘bodying up’, lubricate using Methylated Spirits (do not use with raw linseed oil as a lubricant).